Postsecondary Planning

As students with disabilities transition from secondary to post-secondary education, training, and employment, it is important that they are prepared for those next steps.

This section will provide helpful resources for professionals, parents and students.

    A Postsecondary Planning Guide

    The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS), of the U.S. Department of Education, published the guide below to improve educational, and employment outcomes and raise expectations for all individuals with disabilities, their families, their communities, and the nation.  

     

    Training and Employment

    Competitive Integrated Employment, real work for real pay in a job that aligns the post-school employment goals of the student, is the gold standard of transition outcomes for students with disabilities. This is a desired transition outcome for all youth who choose to work, regardless of disability or needed accommodations or support. Competitive integrated employment is a realistic and desirable expectation for all youth.

    As families, schools, Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) agencies and other partners plan and engage in transition planning with students, it is important to understand that employment looks different for each student. Competitive integrated employment options should be individualized and align with a students’ interests, preferences, skills, and support needs; and with the labor market needs of businesses. By making the connection between student’s interests skills, and preferences and business needs, good job matches can be brokered so employment is a mutually beneficial outcome for both the student and business.

    Some students will enter directly into the workforce based on interest, preference, skills, and support needs while others may attend a training program. Each student’s post-school school goals are difference therefore the routine each student takes may be different.

    Accommodations vs. Modifications

    What is an Accommodation? What is a Modification? The School-Based Definition

    Accommodations help remove barriers and can be used for instruction or testing. They do not change course content or expectations. An accommodation in testing or instruction—which must be previously agreed upon in a case conference committee discussion and is then written into the student’s IEP—might include having a test read aloud, or the option to take the test in a quiet room. Talk with your team about what accommodations should be used in high school and on state standardized tests. Note, however, that allowable accommodations can vary for college entrance and placement tests. Parents, teachers, and students interested in postsecondary education, should talk with their guidance counselor and review the accommodation information available on the ACT and SAT websites.

    Modifications are changes to course content, required work, or instructional level. If your student is considering a diploma track, ask your teachers about gradually reducing or eliminating any modifications your middle school student may be using. Modifications include things like requiring a student to complete only half of the work that other students complete, or providing him/her with simpler material or testing the student on different content.

    For more information, see Understood.org’s article, “The Differences Between Accommodations and Modifications.”

    R.I. Secondary  Transition & Employment First Twitter Feed

    Watch Forget Me Not: Inclusion in the Classroom on Tubi: https://tubitv.com/movies/697442/forget-me-not-inclusion-in-the-classroom?utm_campaign=web-sharing

    We are so excited to host an Open House showcasing the Transition Programs in @pvdschools! Join us on Thursday, January 19th, for this special event! #explorepossibilities #accessforall #transition

    Take a flight over Providence, #RhodeIsland last night as city life zips by below in this aerial timelapse. I recommend viewing on the largest screen you have!

    Read this newsletter from the University of Minnesota Institute on Community Integration - 2 articles that caught our eye
    * Dismantling Myths for #Employment for Indivs w/Disabilities
    * #Transition to #Employment for Ryan in #netRI https://ici.umn.edu/news/the-new-frontline-initiative-supported-employment
    @RITransition @RIPIN_RI

    Choose Significance 👇Preparing students for their own #IEP mtg is a perfect in-school activity that can increase their potential for #PostSecondary success!
    Choose #StudentLed IEP mtgs
    Choose #Adding Value to Others
    Choose #PositiveYouthDevelopment
    @ritransition @SETransition

    We’ve had an incredible day at our Middle School #Transition Fair! Students learned about transportation, budgets, first aid, safety, career & technical opportunities in high school, and so much more! Thank you to everyone who helped make it happen! #ppsdtransition #accessforall

    @TransitionsACR 1/2 Preparing for your #IEP! Look at these infocomics frm @TransitionsACR 🎯
    Getting students to discover & take stock of their #Talents #Strengths #Passions
    https://www.umassmed.edu/TransitionsACR/publication/comic/2022/09/tea-on-ieps-part-2/
    @SEtransition @CHADD_ADHD @CECMembership @Diverse_Edu @VCU_CTI @LetsTalkLD @PTHVP @ritransition

    Teaching my 12 yo son (with Autism, Intellectual Disability, nonverbal) how to shop. Big thanks to Back to Basics in EG for a quiet & patient environment to learn ❤️

    #RITransition @AllisonLombardi @ppsdtransition CC4T Transition mid year Check & Connect @UConnNeag integrating SEL 👏🏻

    2

    Excited for a day of learning and planning with the @pvdschools Special Ed Team for next steps for #PPSDTransition! #explorepossibilities #transition #accessforall

    The audience at the Opening General Session, "Breaking Barriers to Inclusion through Policy, Media, and Transformative Philanthropy", with Nikki Brown-Booker, Kristin Gilger and Jennifer Longdon. https://sched.co/z6u8 #2022TASHconf

    It is with great sadness we announce that Hale Zukas has passed away. Hale Zukas was one of the founders of the Center for Independent Living. He was a Rolling Quads member and worked on the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

    @prisma_group_ @PerspectivesRI @TechACCESSRI @RITransition @TrudeauCenter @TheArcRI @GrodenNetwork @EasterSealsRI @RIadvocates6220 @LPRRI @rilpac @CSemonelli @TinaSpearsRI @GregoryGrecoRI @CPNRI @TedNesi @TheRhodeShow @PLEERI @RIKidsCount @GovDanMcKee

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